About Christopher Lindsay

Christopher Lindsay is the author of The Donkey King and Other Stories. Available on Amazon Kindle.

The Moral Argument Against Employment Equity

equityIn Canada, the Employment Equity Act gives preferential treatment to “women, Aboriginal peoples, persons with disabilities and members of visible minorities” when applying for jobs that are federally regulated.1 In other words, preferential treatment is given to anyone who isn’t a white male.

While there is a moral argument to be made for employment equity for persons with disabilities, the Employment Equity Act violates one of the most basic principles of justice: that everyone should be treated equally and not be discriminated against.

The Employment Equity Act is founded upon a premise which is impossible to prove: that economic inequality between different groups in society is primarily due to discrimination. This discrimination is often labelled as institutional racism: unconscious biases that people in power have against minority groups.

While there are no doubt instances where someone in a position of power has a bias against minority groups, there are many other factors that lead to economic inequality including the place a person lives, their education, work experience and work ethic. Because economic inequality is caused by much more than just discrimination, the Employment Equity Act needs to be changed.

The Act’s provision for persons with disabilities is just. For many jobs, a person with a disability can be at a natural disadvantage when competing with an able-bodied person. Consequently, they have more limited job opportunities. As long as a disabled person is qualified for the job they apply for, giving them preferential treatment is a reasonable form of equity.

The problem with the Employment Equity Act is it suspends the Charter right of white males to be treated equally under the law. Giving preferential treatment in hiring to four designated groups results in discrimination against white males, excluding them from job opportunities.

The legislation is founded on the logical fallacy that two wrongs make a right and that the ends justify the means. It tries to remedy the supposed injustice of economic inequality by legalizing another injustice: reverse discrimination.

A double standard is “a rule or principle which is unfairly applied in different ways to different people or groups.”2 The Employment Equity Act is founded on double standard: Discrimination is unjust but discrimination against white males is not unjust.

A white male seeking a job is not responsible for the historical injustices of the past, or any institutional racism that exists today. If a white male is denied a job for no other reason than the colour of his skin, he is being punished and made a scapegoat for someone else’s crimes. Women, aboriginals, and visible minorities who believe they have been discriminated against should seek remedy through the courts, not by being given preferential treatment when applying for a job.

The Employment Equity Act is Orwellian legislation. In the novel Animal Farm, George Orwell wrote, “All animals are equal, but some animals are more equal than others.”3 The Employment Equity Act makes women, visible minorities and aboriginals “more equal” than white males. In a just society, everyone should be treated equally when they apply for a job.

Notes

  1. Canada, Justice Laws Website. “Employment Equity Act,” http://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/acts/e-5.401/page-1.html
  2. Oxford Dictionaries, s.v. “Double standard,” accessed February 25, 2018, https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/double_standard
  3. George Orwell, Animal Farm (Markham, Ontario: Penguin Books Canada Ltd., 1987), 90.

This article was originally published in The Post Millennial.

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How to Fix Daylight Savings Time

Saving-Daylight

From: tuckermanroger@gmail.com
To: premier@gov.bc.ca
Subject: How to Fix Daylight Savings Time

Dear Premier John Horgan,

Daylight savings time isn’t working for the people of British Columbia. However, I know how to fix it! Instead of moving clocks forward an hour in March, and an hour back in October, simply adjust the time by 24 hours!

Moving clocks 24 hours ahead in March would cause spring to appear earlier, reducing people’s depression from the long Canadian winters. Similarly, moving clocks back 24 hours in October would delay the arrival of winter, making it easier on people’s physical health.

What’s more, this will help reduce the Canadian doctor shortage! When people are healthier, they go to the doctor less often, and doctors will take on more patients. I’m one of five million Canadians who have no doctor, and I really need one!

In addition to making people physically and mentally unwell, daylight savings time increases the number of traffic accidents. Case in point: On Monday March 12, I was speeding to get to work because I overslept, and I smashed into a garbage truck. I totally destroyed my scooter!

A final reason to change daylight savings time is to reduce unemployment. When clocks leap forward an hour, I’m late for work every day for two weeks. Unfortunately, I haven’t found an employer yet who will put up with this, and I always get fired!

If you like my proposal to fix daylight savings time, would you be willing to credit me publicly? The notoriety will improve my employment chances. Sadly, it’s that time of year again when I’m looking for a new job.

Sincerely,

Roger Tuckerman


My Kindle eBook ⇒ The Donkey King and Other Stories

My Kindle eBook is FREE on April 30

bookOn April 30th, my Kindle eBook, The Donkey King and Other Stories, is available for free on any Amazon website!

If you love fables, fairy tales, and folk tales, you will enjoy this collection of 13 short stories.

Most are funny. Some are serious. But they all have a deeper meaning for the reader to discover.

Why You Shouldn’t Shake Anyone’s Hand

handshake-free

From: tuckermanroger@gmail.com
To: editor@kamloopsthisweek.com
Subject: Letter to the Editor

Dear Editor,

I have a dream that one day people in our city will no longer shake each other’s hands. To see this dream become a reality, I am announcing my candidacy for Kamloops City Council.

As a Councillor, I promise to do two things:

  • I will introduce a bylaw to fine people $100 if they force someone to shake their hand.
  • I will introduce a bylaw to make government offices handshake-free zones.

Handshaking is harmful for the following reasons:

  • You can catch a cold or the flu, resulting in lost work time. If you get the flu, you might even die!
  • Handshaking can cause pain that lasts for days when a man who wants to prove his manliness, shakes your hand with an iron grip. Last week, an amateur wrestler shook my hand (against my will), and my fingers still hurt really bad!

Handshaking is dangerous because many people don’t wash their hands after they go to the bathroom, or pick their nose! I recently witnessed two men use the urinals in a men’s room and then shake each other’s hands without washing them. This inspired me to write a jingle for my election campaign, which will soon air on local radio stations. I recorded it with my own voice, and it is set to tuba and flute:

When you shake someone’s hand,
do you know where their hand has been?
There’s a disturbing possibility
their hand isn’t clean.
To stop this monstrosity,
vote for Roger Tuckerman in 2018!
I’m the anti-handshaking man,
and I have a plan!

During my election campaign, I will knock on thousands of doors and introduce people to a cultural practice that is superior to handshaking. With a smile, I will say, “This way!” then clench my hand and bump their fist.

If elected on October 20, 2018, I will make fist-bumping a normative cultural practice in our city, which a recent study found is 20 times more hygienic than handshaking.

Yours truly,

Roger Tuckerman


My Kindle eBook: The Donkey King and Other Stories