The Troll Who Wanted To Build A Wall: A Fable

Theodor_Kittelsen_-_Skogtroll,_1906_(Forest_Troll)Long ago, there was a troll who lived in a cave on a mountain. His head was shaped like a pumpkin, his nose like a banana, and he was ten feet tall. His name was Thug, and he loved one thing more than anything else: He loved gold.

Thug had thousands of gold coins in his cave, which he had taken from the men who tried to kill him. During the day, Thug slept on his coins, and when he woke up in the evening, he played with them, tossing them in the air, or throwing them at the walls and ceiling. But as the years went by, his heart became empty, and the coins no longer satisfied him.

One evening, Thug woke up and said, “I want to do something meaningful with my life.”

Outside Thug’s cave, there were many boulders, and he rolled three to the stream at the bottom of the mountain. Then he returned to his cave and got a stone bowl and a hammer. With his hammer, he smashed the boulders into powder, and mixed the powder with water and his dung to make mortar.

“I put my dung to good purpose!” Thug said with a smile.

Thug worked through the night and built a wall that was six feet wide, ten feet high, and one foot thick. He looked with satisfaction at the work of his hands, then went back to his cave to sleep.

In the evening, when Thug woke up, he went for a walk, and saw a rabbit on the forest path.

“Hello, rabbit,” Thug said.

“Hello, Thug,” the rabbit replied.

“Can you tell rabbits to meet me by stream?”

“What for?”

“I have big surprise!” Thug said excitedly.

“Okay,” the rabbit said.

An hour later, the rabbits all gathered by the stream, and they looked at the wall that Thug had built.

“What is that?” a rabbit asked.

“It is small wall,” Thug said. “I want to build big wall, all around mountain.”

“Why?” another rabbit asked.

“To protect you from bad men who come and hunt you with arrows.”

While the rabbits were staring in awe at the small wall, a cougar climbed down from a tree. Her name was Hickory, and she loved one thing more than anything else: She loved to eat rabbits.

“Don’t run!” Hickory said to the rabbits. “I’m not going to hurt you. I’m going to save you.”

“Save us!” a rabbit said sarcastically. “You like to eat us!”

“Yes, that’s true,” Hickory admitted. “But I would never eat all of you. If the troll builds his wall, you will all die!”

Thug pointed at the cougar and said, “That is fake accusation! I want to protect rabbits from hunters.”

“His wall will save our lives,” another rabbit said. “It will keep the bad men out.”

“And I will keep bad animals out too,” Thug promised. “I will throw cougar over wall. She will not eat you anymore!”

Hearing this, the rabbits cheered. Then, with one voice, they chanted, “Thug! Thug! Thug!”

Hickory did not want to lose her food supply. So when the rabbits stopped chanting, she said, “It is true that Thug’s wall will keep you safe from bad men, and the wall will keep you safe from me. But there is one thing the wall will not do.”

“What is that?” a rabbit asked.

“The wall will not keep you safe from Thug! Once he has you surrounded, he will eat all of you!”

“That is fake accusation!” Thug shouted. “I only eat plants, flowers, and people who try to kill me.”

“Don’t be fools, rabbits!” Hickory continued. “Why would a troll who loves gold want to protect you? Once the wall is built, just imagine what he will do! He will smash you all with his hammer.”

The rabbits looked at each other. Then they looked at Thug and trembled.

“Thug is a monster!” a rabbit cried.

“He’s big and ugly!” another rabbit blurted. “He’s evil!”

The cougar continued to sow fear in the hearts of the rabbits: “And if Thug doesn’t kill you, he will catch you and sell you to the hunters for gold!”

“No!” Thug said to the rabbits. “I only want to save you from harm. I want to do something meaningful with my life.”

“No wall!” a rabbit yelled, then all the rabbits chanted, “No wall! No wall! No wall!”

Hickory looked at Thug and smiled. “Go back to your cave, you deplorable troll, and sleep on your pile of gold.”

Thug tried to reason with the rabbits: “If you don’t let me build wall, hunters and cougar will kill you.”

“But not all of us,” a rabbit said.

Another rabbit added, “If you build the wall, we know what you will do!”

Thug kicked the ground and frowned. “Stupid rabbits! If you don’t want my help, I will go.”

Then he went back to his cave and decided he would take care of the trees on the mountain.

After that, Hickory continued to eat one or two rabbits every day, and the hunters came and killed many rabbits with their arrows.

And all because the rabbits wouldn’t take a risk, and let the troll build a wall.


My Kindle eBook: The Donkey King and Other Stories

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The Positive and Negative Uses of Stigmatization

stigmaTo stigmatize is to “describe or regard [someone] as worthy of disgrace or great disapproval.”1 For good or ill, stigmatization puts pressure on an individual to conform to societal values of right and wrong. While certain stigmas are necessary to prevent harm to innocent people, stigmatizing labels can be used to silence free speech. If you are going to stigmatize someone, you need to have proof that they are guilty of wrong behavior. Otherwise, you may be slandering them.

Stigmatization involves a value judgment of right and wrong. When a behavior is stigmatized, a person who engages in the behavior may be called a stigmatizing name. The resulting feelings of guilt and/or shame become a deterrent against repeating the behavior. Calling someone a stigmatizing name is a form of social pressure, so they will change how they act, at least publicly. Thus, for good or ill, stigmatization is a means of social control: “the enforcement of conformity by society upon its members…”2

When a behavior is no longer stigmatized, people are more likely to engage in the behavior. For example, in previous generations, women were shamed for having children out of wedlock. Today, that stigma has largely been removed, and a much higher percentage of women have children without getting married. In 1940, 3.8% of all births were to unmarried women.3 However, by 2014, the percentage had risen to 40.2%.4 While there are numerous reasons for this social change, the removal of the stigma against out-of-wedlock births is a significant factor.

Many stigmas are justified, especially if the behavior is harmful to other people. One example is Islamophobia, defined as “dislike of or prejudice against Islam or Muslims.”5 If someone expresses hatred or contempt for Muslims, it is fair and accurate to call them an Islamophobe. A social stigma against hatred serves an important function in society: If public declarations of hatred become widespread, it could result in violence against innocent people.

While a social stigma against hatred is justified, stigmatizing labels can be used to silence someone with a different point of view. For instance, a person can be called Islamophobic if they say anything critical of Islam. Islam is a religion, a set of beliefs and practices, and should not be immune from criticism. To disagree with the teachings of Islam is not the same as hating Muslims. Calling someone an Islamophobe because they are critical of Islam is bully behavior, an attempt to discourage them from exercising their right to free speech.

If you call someone a stigmatizing name, you need to be certain that they are guilty of the stigmatized behavior. During the 2016 President election, Hillary Clinton stigmatized millions of Americans who supported Donald Trump. She said, “You can put half of Trump supporters into what I call the basket of deplorables… Racist, sexist, homophobic, xenophobic, Islamaphobic, you name it.”6 Without citing any evidence, Clinton implied that 50 percent of Trump supporters hated minorities, immigrants, women, homosexuals, and Muslims. This was not only a false accusation, but an insult to millions of American voters.

If declared publicly, calling someone a stigmatizing name can be a form of slander: “oral defamation, in which someone tells one or more persons an untruth about another…”7 Unless a person expresses hatred or contempt for a group of people, they should not be called racist, sexist, xenophobic, homophobic, or Islamophobic. If you are incorrect in your judgment, you have slandered the person, damaging their public reputation.

When a person is stigmatized, it creates a public perception that they are a bad person. For this reason, no one should be stigmatized unless they do something bad without showing any regret or remorse. Whenever possible, a person should be corrected gently if they are guilty of wrong behavior; however, stigmatizing labels can be effective when they will not listen to reason. The proper goal of stigmatization is to make a person face the truth about their behavior, so they will stop doing what is wrong.

Notes

  1. Oxford Dictionaries, s.v. “Stigmatize,” accessed November 10, 2016, https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/stigmatize
  2. Dictionary.com Unabridged. Random House Inc. s.v. “Social Control,” accessed November 13, 2016, http://www.dictionary.com/browse/social-control
  3. Stephanie J. Ventur and Christine A. Bachrach, Nonmarital Childbearing in the United States, 1940–99, National Vital Statistics Reports, October 2000, 17, https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr48/nvs48_16.pdf
  4. Brady E. Hamilton, National Vital Statistics Reports, December 2015, 41, http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr64/nvsr64_12.pdf
  5. Oxford Dictionaries, s.v. “Islamophobia,” accessed November 10, 2016, https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/islamophobia
  6. Dan Merica and Sophie Tatum, “Clinton expresses regret for saying ‘half’ of Trump supporters are ‘deplorables’,” CNN, September 12, 2016, http://www.cnn.com/2016/09/09/politics/hillary-clinton-donald-trump-basket-of-deplorables/index.html
  7. Law.com, s.v. “Slander,” accessed August 10, 2017, http://dictionary.law.com/Default.aspx?selected=1969

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